Forest Service Recreational Sport Shooting Management Project

The Partnership would like to take this opportunity to share the maps showing alternative management strategies and ask for feedback from the public before the environmental analysis is finalized. These alternatives were developed collaboratively using Forest Service staff, expertise from the Partnership, and public input during the 2015 scoping period. (Please see bottom of the page for project background.)

Proposed closures would not apply to lawful hunting activities on National Forest System lands. In addition, proposed closures would likely not take effect until developed shooting ranges were constructed in the vicinity (depicted as “zone of closure” on the maps).

 

Regional Maps

Proposed Action – Developed using four guiding factors to determine what lands were suitable or not suitable: (1) distance from residences, structures, or high recreation use areas; (2) density of residences; (3) enforceability; and (4) current shooting use in the area, associated conflicts. In general, a half-mile buffer was used around areas proposed as unsuitable.

See map here.

Focused Closures – Considers only areas unsuitable for dispersed shooting based on (1) current conflicts; and (2) existing emergency closures. In general, a quarter-mile buffer was used around areas proposed as unsuitable.

See map here.

Local Factors – Developed in cooperation with the Northern Front Range Sport Shooting Management Partnership and used different data to inform three criteria: (1) residential housing density; (2) high use recreation areas on FS and County lands; (2) existing conflicts between sport shooting and other uses on FS and county lands. This alternative relied on the professional judgement of the Partnership members to identify areas as suitable or not suitable and considered enforceability of shooting closures.

See map here.

No Dispersed Shooting anywhere on the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests.

See map here.

 

County-Specific Maps

Boulder County

Click an image below to see the larger version of that alternative map.

Boulder Alternative 1 Boulder Alternative 1

Boulder Alternative 2 Boulder Alternative 2

Boulder Alternative 3 Boulder Alternative 3

Boulder Alternative 4 Boulder Alternative 4


Clear Creek County

Click an image below to see the larger version of that alternative map.

Clear Creek Alternative 1 Clear Creek Alternative 1

Clear Creek Alternative 2 Clear Creek Alternative 2

Clear Creek Alternative 3 Clear Creek Alternative 3

Clear Creek Alternative 4 Clear Creek Alternative 4


Gilpin County

Click an image below to see the larger version of that alternative map.

Gilpin Alternative 1 Gilpin Alternative 1

Gilpin Alternative 2 Gilpin Alternative 2

Gilpin Gilpin Alternative 3

Gilpin Alternative 4 Gilpin Alternative 4


Larimer County

Click an image below to see the larger version of that alternative map.

Larimer Alternative 1 Larimer Alternative 1

Larimer Alternative 2 Larimer Alternative 2

Larimer Larimer Alternative 3

Larimer Alternative 4 Larimer Alternative 4

Have a comment about the alternative maps? Please fill out a comment form.

 

Project Timeline

Timeline of the RSS project.

Background Information

Recreational sport shooting (RSS) is a longstanding and legitimate use of National Forest System lands. In recent years Colorado’s population has been increasing annually by more than 100,000 with 80% of this growth occurring along the Front Range. As population has increased, so have the number of people who live near and use the National Forests. The mixing of RSS activities on National Forest System lands in close proximity to residences and other high use public areas is causing safety concerns. Since 2013, the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland has been working with partners including Boulder, Clear Creek, Gilpin, and Larimer counties, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (collectively the Northern Front Range Sport Shooting Management Partnership) to develop possible management strategies for this activity on the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests. This includes not only identifying areas of the Forests that may or may not be suitable for recreational sport shooting, but also identifying locations that would be conducive to building developed shooting ranges open to the public on public lands.